Got Warts? ~ Integrative Dermatology Treatment

Got Warts? ~ Integrative Dermatology Treatment

Let’s talk a little bit about warts and integrative dermatology. Now warts can be very annoying because they are just have an appearance that is unusual and of course some people don’t want to touch other people with them. So we know that they are caused by a virus. And that virus can actually be transmitted.

If they’re at the bottom of your feet they can be very hard to get rid of. And the virus can be transmitted by scraping off a little bit, so that material when you are walking around a swimming pool or a cement area. So of course prevention involves both the person with warts wearing sneakers or slippers when they are walking around the bathing area, and  people who don’t want to get it wearing slippers in those areas.

One way of treating them is to destroy them: burn them, freeze them. And that may work.

But if you have the virus, it can keep coming back. So the other part of getting rid of warts is enhancing somebody’s immune system so that it gets rid of it.

Various supplements like vitamin A can be helpful but there are a variety of other things that can be useful to boost ones immune system to help get rid of them either without treatment or in conjunction with conventional dermatologic treatments that can be used to destroy the warts.


Treating Food Allergy: Holiday Party Food…


6a00e55255b4628834017eea950612970d-200wiTreating food allergy, Candida overgrowth and sensitivity, and leaky gut, has been a cornerstone of my holistic dermatology practice. I’m sure that there are a lot of my patients out there who struggled with those diets, who will chuckle to hear that I recently got a “dose of my own medicine”. I want to share my experience in a short series of ongoing emails and blogs, in hope of inspiring others to make progress, and tell their own stories of success.

A few years ago, my own doctor heard about my own digestive issues, ordered some tests, and found our that I had antibodies in my blood diagnostic of a gluten sensitivity. Since that time, I have been on a fairly strict gluten-free diet, never eating wheat, barley oats or rye, but perhaps getting small amounts of gluten from Chinese restaurant soy sauce, hidden flour, or a crumb here or there that sticks to the bottom of an occasional desert. I have been well, except for a slightly active digestive system at times, and a little arthritis in two finger joints.

Recently, a repeat food test for allergy was done in thanks for giving blood to use to evaluate new testing methods for wheat sensitivity, by a lab that tested me before. The list had enlarged considerably from the first test, taking away some 50 of my favorite foods. Still reasonably cheerful, I went to the produce store in New Rochelle and bought the vegetables and foods which were still permitted on my list, and found out that I could put together some delicious but simple meals.

I also found out that I could use what was allowed to make some really tasty snacks with allowed ingredients I had never put together in those ways before. I used orange juice instead of lemon, ginger where I would have used garlic, and sesame paste to make my salad dressing.

The problem came with going to a big celebration, and then ordering food the next day. I did not notice any immediate change from all of the foods I ate out, but did get very tired after eating food with my problem soy sauce. The day after, I ate one piece of the dish, permitted by my food test (but interestingly, not by my tribe), and immediately felt a kind of heaviness and faint fogginess overtake my head.

When I bothered to check my chart, two out of three of the vegetables were not permitted, along with the soy sauce (which has traces of wheat and possibly corn starch to thicken it). So much for easy ordering and eating. I will have to prepare food from scratch. 

To your health,

Dr. Alan M. Dattner, MD


Holistic Dermatology
New York, New York

 

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As always, the content of this blog is for information and education purposes only, and should not be used to prevent, diagnose or treat illness; please see your physician for care.